Dennis, Walter, Ship's Log, 23-24 April 1915

00001363.jpg
Description: 
HMS Vengeance log

Tabs

Case Study: 
British Forces in the Middle East
Creator: 
Dennis, Walter
Source: 
Ship's Log
Date: 
23-24 April 1915
Place: Dardanelles
Collection/Fonds: 
Contributer: 
McMaster University Libraries
Rights: 
Copyright, public domain: McMaster University owns the rights to the archival copy of the digital image in TIFF format.

Identifier: 
00001363
Language: 
eng
Type: 
image
Format: 
jpg
Transcript: 

April 23rd cont – joined the flag of C in C. During the afternoon 6 aeroplanes were observed flying towards the Dardanelles. At 4 o/c pm the “Prince George”& “Albion” proceeded on patrol at the mouth of the Dardanelles.
April 24th – Coal received to-day 140 tons.
Coal received since mobilizing 17,618 tons
The Rear Admiral commanding 1st squadron replied to C in C assuring him of the eagerness of all ranks to commence the operations & of their unswerving loyalty to his (C in Cs) leadership
April 24th – At Tenedos. At daybreak a number of transports, escorted by “Euryalus”, flying flag of Rear Admiral Wemyss, “Implacable” & “Cornwallis” arrived. During the forenoon all the steam boats of the squadron were armed provisioned, and the crews armed with rifles and dispatched to “Euryalus”. At 11 o/c orders were issued for all ships to complete with coal and at 11.45 the SS “Cairngwan” secured alongside & coaling commenced immediately & was finished at 1 o/c pm. At 4 o/c pm the C in C in “Queen Elizabeth” arrived sailing again an hour later. During the evening our Captain assembled all hands on the QD & informed us that the operations would be resumed to-morrow morning on a much larger scale than anything yet attempted and, apparently there are going to be ships of the Allied squadron placed at intervals, right round the Gallipoli Peninsula from the “Dublin” in the Gulf of Saros, to the “Vengeance” in the Dardanelles just a little North of the Seddul Bahr. Obviously so disposed to protect the troops in their landing. Before leaving, the C in C signaled to all ships, his hopes of final victory in the operations about to commence and his confidence in all ranks doing their utmost to that end.