Brittain, Vera, Diary, 28-29 November 1914

00000286.jpg
Description: 
Diary of Vera Brittain

Tabs

Case Study: 
From Youth to Experience: Vera Brittain’s Work for Peace in Two World Wars
Creator: 
Brittain, Vera
Source: 
diary
Date: 
28-29 November 1914
Collection/Fonds: 
Contributer: 
McMaster University Libraries
Rights: 
Vera Brittain estate; McMaster University has a non-exclusive licence to publish this document.

Identifier: 
00000286
Language: 
eng
Type: 
image
Format: 
jpg
Transcript: 

Sat. Nov. 28th
Presque rien de dire. There is rather good news from the Russian front, the German defeat being confirmed. I sent some sandman [?] tobacco to Edward as his birthday present. I could not help thinking of him this morning when the rain was deluging in a heavy down pour, & wondering how he liked being under canvas in such weather as this. I hear from Father that Percy Spafford & young Warren have been in Buxton, being allowed 96 hours leave from France. Percy was looking very fit & well, but Marjorie Briggs’ husband very worn & harassed looking, because he has work that takes him right to the front.
Miss Schenzinger, Miss Gundy & I had tea with Miss & Mrs Fumor this afternoon & stayed for ages talking in the twilight, chiefly about Greek & exams.
Katherine came & had cocoa with me when I had finished my work this evening. We discussed people a good deal & chiefly me. K. says that of the several people she has asked out of curiosity how they like me, most of them say they cannot make me out, & wonder if I am sincere or not. I tried to convince her that I really am, although often I deliberately act, & sometimes even deceive people. She wondered very much why I did it & I said with perfect truth that as a rule I did not know. She said I was different when I was alone from what I am with other people, & that I seem to have two personalities. I think she was fairly right there; she seems to be pretty sharp at reading character.
Sunday Nov. 29th
Dorothy & I went this morning to the University Church, where the Bishop of Oxford preached a most splendid & inspiring sermon. The chief thing I remember about it is that it was an address particularly to people like students here who are engaged in the intellectual or artistic side of