Aldwinckle, Eric, Letter, 17 August 1944

00001605.jpg
Description: 
Letter to Ruth Somers

Tabs

Case Study: 
Creative Dialogue Across the Ocean: Eric Aldwinckle’s Letters to Harry Somers
Creator: 
Aldwinckle, Eric
Source: 
letter
Date: 
17 August 1944
Place: Normandy
Collection/Fonds: 
Contributer: 
McMaster University Libraries
Rights: 
Copyright, public domain: McMaster University owns the rights to the archival copy of the digital image in TIFF format. Reproduced with the kind permission of Margaret Bridgman.

Identifier: 
00001605
Language: 
eng
Type: 
image
Format: 
jpg
Transcript: 

Normandy, Aug 17 1944
Dear Ruth,
Since D Day we have had with us, surrounding us, attacking us, pinching from us, and aggravating us, the completely unmentioned army of wasps, which seems to increase as summer proceeds on and we proceed south. They are constantly noising around in the tents, in the mess, on the jam. They show a keen interest in hard boiled sweets, or the old wrappings from hard boiled sweets, and now have an unsatisfied curiosity toward Vitalis and any good shaving cream, having completely run out of apple blossoms since June.
Strong healthy men seem to be in some great fear of them; even pilots, who face flack and fearlessly seek the Focke Wolfe or fight in the air at night seem in terror when surrounded by erratic ZS flight of one black and yellow wasp. Nothing will convince them that they will not bite if left alone, though it is admitted their biteless excursions a few inches from the body or face is reason enough for all the irritation which expresses itself. It is not uncommon to hear from some adjoining field, bush or tent some single emphatic reference to those they have been taught to worship, or aspire to since their childhood. Some place a curse upon the offending insect, asking God for assistance. The unknowing would think religion was an integral part of their daily life, that is, the formal Christian religion.
There are some doubts on this point.