Aldwinckle, Eric, Letter, 15 July 1944

00001600-4.jpg
Description: 
Letter to Harry Somers

Tabs

Case Study: 
Creative Dialogue Across the Ocean: Eric Aldwinckle’s Letters to Harry Somers
Creator: 
Aldwinckle, Eric
Source: 
letter
Date: 
15 July 1944
Place: France
Collection/Fonds: 
Contributer: 
McMaster University Libraries
Rights: 
Copyright, public domain: McMaster University owns the rights to the archival copy of the digital image in TIFF format. Reproduced with the kind permission of Margaret Bridgman.

Identifier: 
00001600-4
Language: 
eng
Type: 
image
Format: 
jpg
Transcript: 

The traffic is 'triffic'. After digging myself in and establishing myself, I turned my attention to all important transportation.--- after some difficulties I now have a motor cycle and am able to get to the many places of interest and activity for my work. A fairly good account of my first attempt at sketching here before I acquired a motorcycle is related by Gregory Clark of The Toronto Star so I won't repeat it. It is probably in to-day's paper, as his copy is cabled over. In fact if you read his articles just now you will be reading much of the surroundings and goings on which I might not be allowed to relate in letter, but which he can in articles because they go through a special censor channel. His tent is next to mine and he is quite a 'card' -- not very deep but quite likeable.
So now if you look at the map of France which we occupy you can imagine me anywhere along the roads on my motorcycle or sketching in between the roads or on the shore and now you know where I am, and Greg Clark's articles will be two days old. I wonder where you are and what you are doing. It will be a pleasure when mail comes through for me. I have lost track of you lately. I hope you won't neglect to write. It seemed strange to be sitting inside a bit of Hitler's west wall to-day with his massive concrete gun sites. They love lots of concrete. It didn't do them much good. One of the army men was telling me how they had all the paths or trails on the shores and cliffs loaded with mines and all the places marked "Achtung Minen" were clear. Thanks to a patriotic Frenchman our first regiment were soon enlightened on this cunning trick and he steered them safely through all the minefields to capture the first town.
Well good luck boy
Here's thinking of you
Eric
Please excuse writing but its no fun writing with a fine drawing pen.