Aldwinckle, Eric, Letter, 1 August [1944]

00001604-4.jpg
Description: 
Letter to Harry Somers

Tabs

Case Study: 
Creative Dialogue Across the Ocean: Eric Aldwinckle’s Letters to Harry Somers
Creator: 
Aldwinckle, Eric
Source: 
letter
Date: 
1 August [1944]
Place: France
Collection/Fonds: 
Contributer: 
McMaster University Libraries
Rights: 
Copyright, public domain: McMaster University owns the rights to the archival copy of the digital image in TIFF format. Reproduced with the kind permission of Margaret Bridgman.

Identifier: 
00001604-4
Language: 
eng
Type: 
image
Format: 
jpg
Transcript: 

This cost me a few blisters but after hearing the shrapnel from our own flak flying about at night I decided everyone was very wise. So inside my tent I have a 5x12 - 4 ft deep trench with two handsome steps. On top are ration boxes filled with earth upon which I have built with more empties a 'moderne' corner of shelves and cases for my technical equipment. Down below I bedded it with some straw I found in an old farm house, and lined it and matted it with sacking. It is altogether more comfortable than running out of the tent and jumping into a slit trench as some of them do. We only suffer prowlers, and an occasionally bombing or shoot up but the real danger is from our own terrific barrage. Perhaps it is for this reason that I find, to my interest when crouched below, I feel no fear. Only inconvenience and interest. If it is continuous I move my bed roll down and sleep -- or try to -- there, but it is not as airy as on top and I prefer not to go down unless I have to.
If you ask, 'do I get any music here' I would say constantly. Silence is a rare thing here. There is the ceaseless roar of (fortunately) our superior airforce. There is the sound of gunfire on all fronts. Sometimes it sounds terrible.